Statistics


There is clear evidence that men’s health is unnecessarily poor across Europe.

WHO European Region Statistics

  • For the WHO European region as a whole in 2015, the average life expectancy at birth was 75 for men and 81 for women, a difference of 6 years.
  • In 2015, Switzerland had the highest life expectancy at birth for men at 81.3 years and Spain had the highest for women at 85.5 years and Turkmenistan had the lowest for men and women at 62.2 years and 70.5 years respectively.
  • For the European region as a whole in 2015 the average healthy life expectancy at birth was 67 years for men and 72 years for women.

European Union (28 States)

  • Life expectancy at birth in the EU-28 was estimated at 80.9 years in 2014, reaching 83.6 years for women and 78.1 years for men.
  • While life expectancy has risen in all EU Member States, there are still major differences between and within countries. For men, the lowest life expectancy in 2014 was recorded in Latvia (69.1 years) and the highest in Cyprus (80.9 years). For women, the range was narrower, from a low of 78.0 years in Bulgaria to a high of 86.2 years in Spain.

The State of Men’s Health in Europe

  • There were 630,000 deaths among men of working age (15-64) in 2007 across Europe, of which almost a third (about 198,000) were before the age of 50 years. By comparison, there were 300,000 deaths in women of working age and about 86,500 deaths before the age of 50.
  • The adult mortality rates (the probability of dying per 1,000 population) for men and women aged 15-60 years for the Europe region were 183 for men and 81 for women.
  • The main causes of preventable deaths in men include smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, poor diets (too much fat and red/processed meat and too little fruit, vegetables and fibre), being overweight, and a lack of physical exercise. In the European region, 41% of men (aged 15+) smoke compared to 22% women.
  • Men are less likely than women to make effective use of primary care services, especially for preventative health care screening (e.g. for hypertension and high cholesterol levels). Men are also less likely to have dental or eye check-ups.

Men’s Health Policies

  •  Only one country in Europe, Ireland, has developed a national policy for addressing men’s health.

SOURCES

WHO European Region Statistics

  • WHO World Health Statistics 2016 – http://www.who.int/gho/publications/world_health_statistics/2016/en/
  • Wang, H et al. Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980–2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 -http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)31012-1/abstract

European Union

  • Eurostat – http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Mortality_and_life_expectancy_statistics#Life_expectancy_is_increasing

The State of Men’s Health in Europe

Men’s Health Policies